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YOGA FOR FIREFIGHTERS CLASS DETAILS

Helmets not necessary.
Bunker gear and helmet not required.

WHAT’S ALL THIS ABOUT?
This class is beginner friendly and appropriate for all experience levels. It will be therapeutic yoga, designed to undo the damage done to the body either at work or just the stress of everyday living. Each class will have a nice balance of work for increasing flexibility, joint stability, balance and overall stress relief. Sound like something you need, then read on…

WHO’S IT FOR?
This class is available to active and retired firefighters and their immediate families.

WHEN?
Mondays from 5:00 pm-6:00 pm, please arrive at least 10 minutes before class begins. Starting date- November 16, 2015.

WHERE?
Toledo Firefighter Union Hall
714 Washington Street
Toledo, OH 43604

HOW MUCH?
5 class pre-paid pass is $60.00.
Passes are perfect for those that know they want to commit to a class, but may not be able to make every week.

Drop-in price is $15.00 per class.
Not sure yoga is for you, try dropping into a class. This one class at at a time approach is a perfect way to test the waters with no long term commitment.

Cash, Check or Credit Cards accepted.

I’M INTRIGUED, TELL ME MORE….

**Don’t own a mat? No problem. Mats and props will be available for use at no additional charge, the only condition is you must let Tara know that you will be coming and need a mat before class.

** What should I wear and bring? Don’t feel awesome in spandex pants, no problem. Just wear something comfortable, Lightweight clothing is best, layers are your friend. I recommend bringing a beach size towel with you, the floor can be hard and cold.

**Drop in participation is welcome, so long as there is space available. If you want to drop into a class shoot me (Tara) an email at kestnert@bex.net before class just to ensure space is available and I have enough equipment on hand.

HOW DO I JOIN?

You can email me at kestnert@bex.net and indicate if you want a pass or want to drop in. Message me on Facebook at Tara Kestner Next Level Yoga Ltd.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
Like our facebook page for updates http://www.facebook.com/nextlevelyogaltd
or, email kestnert@bex.net

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FOOD!!! Piper’s Power Bites Recipe

 

For those of you who were at the Yoga & Essential Oils event, and loved my daughter’s treats, here is the recipe. They are not low cal, but they are full of clean, whole, delicious food.

power bites
Piper’s Power Bites
Ingredients:
1 cup finely shredded coconut
1 cup nut butter (peanut, almond, cashew whatever you like)
1 cup dried cranberries
1/2 raw honey
1/2 tsp salt
2 TBS chia seeds
3 drops doTerra Wild Orange essential oil

Place all ingredients in mixer bowl EXCEPT for a 1/2 cup of coconut. Mix well until well combined. Refrigerate until firm (10-20 mins).

Roll into balls then coat with remaining coconut. Refrigerate or freeze until firm. Store in the refrigerator.

All Level Wednesday Yoga Class

All level poster

I have an new on-going yoga class which is open to the public, here’s the 411…

WHAT’S THIS?
Hatha yoga is the name for the type of yoga generally practiced in the US. The word hatha translates to Sun and Moon, denoting the union and balance of opposing forces, heavy right? Basically, it means yoga with movement, postures and a focus on breathing for increased flexibility, joint mobility and stress relief.

This class is beginner friendly and appropriate for all experience levels.  It’s designed to undo the damage we all do to the body either from athletic activity or just the stress of everyday living. Each class will have a nice balance of work for increasing flexibility, joint stability, balance and overall mobility. Sound like something you need, then read on…

WHEN?
Wednesday evenings from 6:00 pm-7:00 pm

WHERE?
CPW Health Center
3130 Central Park West Dr. Suite A
Toledo, OH (419) 841-9622

HOW MUCH?
6 class pre-paid pass is $60.00.

Drop-in price is $12.00 per class, subject to space availability.

Cash, Check or Credit Cards accepted.

I’M INTRIGUED, TELL ME MORE….

**Don’t own a mat? No problem. Mats and props will be available for use at no additional charge.

**Space is limited, therefore, participants holding pre-paid passes have first chance at class space (another good reason to buy the pass).

**Drop in participation is welcome, so long as there is space available. If you want to drop into a class you must check with me (Tara) at kestnert@bex.net before class just to ensure space is available.

HOW DO I JOIN?

You can email me at kestnert@bex.net and indicate if you want a pass or want to drop in. Message me on Facebook at Tara Kestner Next Level Yoga Ltd.

You can call CPW Health Center (419) 841-9622 and tell them to sign you up.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
Like our facebook page for updates www.facebook.com/nextlevelyogaltd
or, email  kestnert@bex.net

Yoga for Firefighters, Shoulder Edition, Part 3- The Sequence

nj2

In the final installment of Yoga for Firefighters, Shoulder Edition series, we will put together the poses from Parts 1 and 2 into a sequence.

First, get comfortable. Wear something that allows you to move freely, but not so loose that it falls over your head. Second, since you are going to be on the ground, I suggest you use a yoga mat. If you don’t have a mat, try a beach towel. You may want to consider a little extra padding for your knees, you can fold up a blanket or towel for this purpose.

And finally a word about music. There is a big debate in the yoga world about whether you should play music while doing/teaching yoga. I am on record as a big, fat YES. Maybe it’s just my mind being a bit too dark and twisty to be alone in, but I like a little distraction.

That being said, the classic, new age yoga music is not my thing. Instead, I use a wide mix of music for yoga, tunes that I like but are not too upbeat. I have found old Motown is the universally accepted genre, but use what you like.

Let’s start out with a brief warm up.  I like to use a simple vinyasa as a warm-up.  What’s that you say, a vin-what-sa? Vinyasa is a fancy yoga word for breathing and moving, all at the same time, it’s gets the circulation going and gives you a chance to practice a little deep breathing.

It’s quite easy, start out by standing with your hands down at your side.  With a big inhale, roll your palms up, thumbs back and lift your arms up over your head.  Pause.

Then with a big, exaggerated exhale, bend your knees, to protect the low back, and swan dive down over the legs to a forward fold. Get yourself a nice roll going at a comfortable pace, inhaling up exhaling down, and continue for a full minute.

Here are some forward fold pointers.

forward_fold_smforward_fold-good_sm

After this brief warm up, let’s start out by getting and holding the shoulders in proper alignment with Extended Mountain/Upward Salute for 5 long breaths.

The details of this pose, as well as, Reverse Tabletop and Spinal Balance are here: http://nextlevelyoga.net/2015/04/29/yoga-for-firefighters-shoulder-edition-part-2/

Extended Mountain Pose or Upward Salute
Extended Mountain Pose or Upward Salute

After Extended Mountain, let’s work on some strength in Reverse Tabletop. Take this pose two times for about 3-5 long breaths, with a 30 second rest.

Reverse Tabletop works the same as Upward Plank, it is a personal preference thing.
Reverse Tabletop works the same as Upward Plank, it is a personal preference thing.

After Reverse Tabletop, lets stretch out the back of the shoulder in Thread the Needle, for about 30 seconds to 1 minute per side (or 5-10 long breaths).  The details of this pose, as well as, Anterior Shoulder Opener and Puppy pose are here: http://nextlevelyoga.net/2015/04/26/yoga-for-firefighters-shoulder-edition-part-1/

Thread the Needle pose
Thread the Needle pose

Now let’s hit the deck and move into Anterior Shoulder Opener for about 30 seconds to 1 minute per side (or 5-10 long breaths).

Anterior shoulder opener
Anterior shoulder opener

From here, push up to hands and knees, and move into Puppy pose for 30 seconds (5 breaths).

Puppy Pose.
Puppy Pose.

Finally, let’s finish this thing with a nice Supine Spinal twist for at least a minute per side.

Reclined Spinal Twist
Reclined Spinal Twist

For those of you who don’t need the visual, here is a list of the poses and times:

Warm up Swan Dive Vinyasa 1 minute

Extended Mountain/Upward Salute, 5 breaths

Reverse Tabletop, two sets 3-5 breaths each

Thread the Needle, 30 secs/1 min. each side (5-10 breaths)

Anterior Shoulder Opener, 30 sec/1 min. each side (5-10 breaths)

Puppy Pose, 30 seconds (3-5 breaths)

Supine Spinal Twist, 1 minute each side (10 breaths)

Total time- about 10 minutes

Give this a try a 3 or 4 times a week and see if you notice a difference in your shoulder health and performance.

If you are interested in trying an all-level yoga class, I have an open class which meets on Wednesday evenings at CPW Health Center, contact me for more information. Also, if you would like a live Yoga For Firefighters class, contact Lt. Joe Clark, or the Toledo Firefighters Health Plan and let them know you are interested.

Tara Kestner, RYT 200

Yoga For Firefighters, Shoulder Edition, Part 2

1eba860c0b10bb3cd1717e8a62de7440

In part two of this Yoga for Firefighters, Shoulder Edition, we will cover a craze which appears to be sweeping the nation, labrum issues.  It seems like everyone has a piece of this particular action, just ask Kevin Love.  I cannot count the number of times someone has sidled up to me after a class and said “what have you got for a bad shoulder.”  After a little bit of q & a, I usually find out the person has some sort of labrum damage.

In my previous post, cleverly titled Shoulder Edition, Part 1, I covered the shoulder structure. Building on that, we will delve into the details of the glenoid socket and labrum. By the way, the labrum is in the shoulder and hip, if you are thought it was a part exclusive to females, you are going to need some remedial anatomy work, and that’s a whole other post.

The glenoid socket is rimmed with a fibrous tissue called the labrum. Injury to the labrum can happen either through trauma or repetitive action. Common occurrences include falling on an outstretched arm, a sudden pull when trying lift a heavy object or a violent overhead reach. Know anyone who might do this as part of the their job? If a labrum tear is diagnosed, anti-inflammatory drugs are usually prescribed and surgery may be necessary.

Once a labrum tear is healed enough that the person is cleared for activity, yoga can be helpful to regain mobility in the shoulder joint.  Certain poses can strengthen and condition the rotator cuff muscles which support the shoulder structure. Finally, by increasing the circulation to the area, the labrum and other connective tissue is conditioned and will hopefully develop more elasticity and tone.

Here are a couple of examples. First, assuming the inflammation has passed and the joint pain has subsided, we need to re-determine the right alignment of the shoulder, to do that try Extended Mountain pose (also called Upward Salute). This may seem like simply reaching your arms in the air, but there is more to it than that.

Extended Mountain Pose or Upward Salute
Extended Mountain Pose or Upward Salute

Stand with your hands by your side, turn your palms up rotating your thumbs back, then sweep the arms up overhead. Once up there, allow your shoulders to sink down away from your ears and slightly back, then notice how your shoulder feels in this proper alignment.  You may be surprised how difficult this is to hold properly. Hold for 3-5 long breaths, then lower arms and repeat 2 more times.

Next for flexibility, try Reverse Tabletop (or Upward Plank). This  pose will stretch and strengthen the pectoral attachments at the front of the shoulder. I prefer Reverse Tabletop, but many people like Upward Plank.  They accomplish the same stretch, choose the one you like.

Reverse Tabletop works the same as Upward Plank, it is a personal preference thing.
Reverse Tabletop works the same as Upward Plank, it is a personal preference thing, choose the one you like.

For Reverse Tabletop, sit on the ground with your hands several inches behind the hips, fingers pointed toward your feet. Place your feet on the floor, at least a foot from your butt. Lift your hips until your torso and thighs are parallel with the floor, adjust your feet as necessary. Press your shoulder blades against your back to lift your chest, allow your head to fall back as far as you can without compressing your neck.

Upward Plank is simply Reverse Tabletop with straight legs, flattening the soles of the feet, reaching toes for the floor. There is more leverage at play in Upward Plank, which can make it more intense. Hold for 3-5 breaths, sit back on the floor, rest, then repeat one more time.

Upward Plank Pose
Upward Plank Pose

Finally, let’s work on strengthening the back rotator cuff muscles, which are usually the weak sister of that group of muscles. We will do this in a reclined pose called Supine Spinal Twist.

Reclined Spinal Twist
Supine Spinal Twist

Lie on your back with your knees lifted directly over your hips. Extend the arms out palms facing up, pressing the forearms firmly into the floor, activating the backs of the shoulders.  If this is too painful, try the cactus arm version with a 90 degree bend in the arms, pressing elbows firmly on the floor.

Now, allow your knees to drop to one side. Adjust the knees so that BOTH shoulders stay fully anchored on the floor. That means you are going to have to adjust the height of the knees and probably the degree of bend as well. Gently press the upper back into the floor forcing the rear rotator cuff muscles to contract. Hold for about 1 minute on each side.

These are a few more of the many yoga poses that can help with shoulder issues.  In the final installment of Yoga for Firefighters, Shoulder Edition, I will put together a short sequence you can do everyday to help relieve shoulder pain and condition the shoulder for better performance.

If you are interested in trying an all-level yoga class, I have an open class which meets on Wednesday evenings at CPW Health Center, contact me for more information. Also, if you would like a live Yoga For Firefighters class, contact Lt. Joe Clark, or the Toledo Firefighters Health Plan and let them know you are interested.

Tara Kestner, RYT 200

Yoga for Firefighters, Shoulder Edition: Part 1

fire-yoga-fold

We are working on getting a Yoga for Firefighters (and their families) class approved by the Firefighter’s Health Plan. The tenacious and dapper Lt. Joe Clark is spearheading this effort, but until that is off the ground, I wanted to address some of the specific physical challenges that firefighting creates.

First up, the shoulder. In order to understand which yoga postures are helpful to prevent shoulder injuries, and in the event that fails, promote recovery of shoulder issues, you have to know a little about the shoulder structure.

In short, the shoulder is built for mobility, not stability or strength. The shoulder joint (the glenoid socket) is a wide and shallow joint which has a large range of motion.  Because of this huge range, injuries happen fairly easily. The supporting cast of the back side of the shoulder are the four rotator cuff muscles, the trapezius, the levator scapulae and the rhomboids. The pectorals support from the front, and the deltoids form the end caps.

Common issues include, tendonitis, bursitis and impingement (often vaguely called “rotator cuff injuries”). Cumulative stress on the shoulder is caused by repetitive movements, compression (being forced to bear weight) and sustained, awkward positional use (like overhauling a building). Any of this sounding familiar?

So how can yoga help? Well first of all, thanks for asking, good to see you are still reading, yoga can help a couple of ways. Yoga increases flexibility and range of motion, allowing you to move more freely avoiding impingement issues. Yoga poses which strengthen and condition the rotator cuff muscles add support to the shoulder structure. Finally, you can expect increased circulation to the shoulder to help avoid inflammation issues, and speed recovery should an injury occur.

Three of my favorite shoulder poses include Thread the Needle, Prone Anterior Shoulder opener (it doesn’t have a cute yoga name) and Puppy pose. First, Thread the Needle, great for opening that space between the shoulder blades.

Thread the Needle pose
Thread the Needle pose

Come to hands and knees, extend your right arm out to the side lining up the wrist, elbow and shoulder. Then feed the right arm (palm facing up) behind the left arm and lower down on the right outer shoulder, adjust yourself until you find a place where your head and neck are comfortable.

Start to walk the fingers on the left hand up towards the top of the mat, until you can gently press into the palm causing a little more sensation and rotation in the upper back. Hold for 5-10 long breaths and then switch sides.

Second, Prone Anterior Shoulder opener, is a fantastic pose to open the front of the shoulder. This is an easy pose to overdo so show some restraint.

Anterior shoulder opener
Anterior shoulder opener

Lie on your belly, turn your head to the right (resting on your left cheek). Extend your right arm out and line up your index finger with your sight-line. Then turn your head to the left, so you are resting on your right cheek.

Start to roll onto your right side and bend your knees, bringing your left palm to the floor, close to your chest. If you are feeling a lot of sensation in the front of the shoulder stay here. If you need a little more, straighten your right leg and place your left foot on the floor behind you. Stay here for about 30-60 seconds, and then take it to the other side.

Finally, Puppy pose for an overall shoulders and the spinal stretch.

Puppy Pose.
Puppy Pose.

Come to hands and knees, keeping the hips over the knees walk the hands forward, lowering the chest towards the floor. Lower your forehead, (or possibly your chin) to the mat, draw your shoulder blades back and down into the spine and reach your hips for the ceiling. Hold for 5-10 slow breaths.

These three poses can help improve your shoulder health.  In part 2 of shoulder edition, I will address the specific problem of labrum injuries, a craze that seems to be sweeping the nation.

Tara

Tips for Choosing a Yoga Mat.

big stack of mats
There are a lot of options out there

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People often ask me which yoga mat is the best, and while I can answer that question with absolute certainty for me, I think you have to consider all the variables.

My mat of choice is the Jade Fusion, it was an absolute game changer. Given that I have some of the boniest knees on the planet, I tried numerous mat and supplemental padding permutations. When I found the Fusion mat, my life changed. No more folding mats or setting up towels, I could just kneel and focus on the stretch, rather than counting the seconds until I could get back up. I have several of them that I let clients use just so they can see the difference. Check out the Jade Fusion here https://amzn.to/2qKMjsn

This is not to say I think this is the right mat for everyone, it has some downside. First, it costs a small fortune by comparison to other mats. Second, it weighs as much as my cat, so lugging it around can be a burden. And, because of the extra density, it makes balance poses a bit more challenging. But to me, those are prices I am more than willing to pay.

cat in mat
Oh, that’s why its so heavy…

My standard advice when buying a mat is look for density. There are some nice mats out there that won’t break the bank. If you have been practicing for a while and are ready to treat yourself to a premium mat, check out Jade and Manduka. I have a Manduka mat that I use at my office and it is really nice, not quite as dense as the Fusion, but a really good mat at about half the price. Check out my Manduka mat here: https://amzn.to/2H7PqkT

There are good options at places like TJ Maxx and Target. Gaiam is probably best known, they have a premium line which I am seeing a lot of and people seem pleased with them. When looking at mats, try to find a minimum density of 5mm, you can generally tell by the size of the roll how dense the mat is, if it looks like a taquito, it is probably 3mm so move on. Here is a good Gaiam mat: https://amzn.to/2J5ZjjD

Also, consider length. Standard length is 68” which is fine if you are 5’8 or shorter. If you are taller, there are longer mats available, you just may have to order them. For taller clients, I recommend they spend the extra few bucks for the 74” mat, it is a rarely regretted decision. Extra wide mats also exist, so don’t just buy the first thing you see, get what you need. Jade 74″ Fusion mat here  https://amzn.to/2J6i2f3 Gaiam also has a nice extra long/wide mat as well: https://amzn.to/2HtgTAR 

While there are plenty of mats which will serve you well out there, I have definite opinions about those big puffy “fitness mats.” Stay away from them. They are not designed for yoga, they have no grip, the ends roll up, and they condense to a tissue thin sheet when you press on them. I cannot tell you how many people have bought them thinking the puffiness will make them more comfortable, only to be disappointed and frustrated when they don’t work.

This guy, yeah stay away from him
This guy, yeah stay away from him

Bottom line when buying a mat, consider how often you practice, if it’s more than once a week, spend a little more for a premium mat. If you practice once a week or less, get yourself a nice quality 5mm from one of the mass retailers. A final word of warning, if you float the idea of getting a mat as a present, be specific about the mat you want, otherwise the decision will be made on color and price and that does not always end well.

All-Level Hatha Yoga Class

lp

We are starting a new on-going yoga class which will be open to the public, here’s the 411…

WHAT’S THIS?
Hatha yoga is the name for the type of yoga generally practiced in the US. The word hatha translates to Sun and Moon, denoting the union and balance of opposing forces, heavy right? Basically, it means yoga with movement, postures and a focus on breathing for increased flexibility, joint mobility and stress relief.

This class is beginner friendly and appropriate for all experience levels.  It’s designed to undo the damage we all do to the body either from athletic activity or just the stress of everyday living. Each class will have a nice balance of work for increasing flexibility, joint stability, balance and overall mobility. Sound like something you need, then read on…

WHEN?
Wednesday evenings from 6:00-7:00. A starting date will be announced when a minimum number of participants have confirmed.

WHERE?
CPW Health Center
3130 Central Park West Dr. Suite A
Toledo, OH (419) 841-9622

HOW MUCH?
6 class pre-paid pass is $60.00.

Drop-in price is $12.00 per class, subject to space availability.

Cash, Check or Credit Cards accepted.

I’M INTRIGUED, TELL ME MORE….

**Don’t own a mat? No problem. Mats and props will be available for use at no additional charge.

**Space is limited, therefore, participants holding pre-paid passes have first chance at class space (another good reason to buy the pass).

**Drop in participation is welcome, so long as there is space available. If you want to drop into a class you must check with Tara at kestnert@bex.net before class to ensure space is available.

HOW DO I JOIN?

You can email Tara at kestnert@bex.net and indicate if you want a pass or want to drop in.

You can call CPW Health Center (419) 841-9622 and tell them to sign you up.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
Like our facebook page for updates www.facebook.com/nextlevelyogaltd
or, email Tara at kestnert@bex.net

YOGA 101: All About the Basics

group

6 Week Beginner’s Series

Have you ever wanted to give yoga a try but were too intimidated to walk into an open level class? Or, have you been practicing yoga for a while and have no idea why you are doing these poses or even if you doing them correctly?  If so, this series is for you.

This 6 week series is designed to introduce the fundamentals of yoga, breath and alignment.  We will cover some basic anatomy and discuss ways to increase mobility and overall flexibility to avoid injury and enhance well-being. After completion you will feel confident walking into any yoga class.

Starting January 24, 2015, on Saturday mornings we will meet from 9:30-10:30 am at CPW Health Center, 3131 Central Park West Drive, Suite A, Toledo, Ohio and build a strong foundation for your yoga practice.  No experience or equipment is necessary.

The price is $60.00 for the 6 week session.

Class size is limited, so contact Tara today at kestnert@bex.net to reserve your spot.

Common Complaints: The Hip Flexors

One of the most common complaints I hear from athletes is that they have “tight hips.” On further review, I generally discover the culprit is the mystical hip flexor which is actually a group of muscles that allow the hip to flex and extend. Basically, the hip flexors allow the hip to draw the knee towards the chest. When the hip flexors are tight, doing a simple child’s pose will feel like wearing pants that are three sizes too small.

The hips are a complex piece of bodily equipment, the problematic hip flexors are primarily three muscles that make up the iliopsoas group; the psoas major, psoas minor, and the iliacus. Other important muscles of the leg make up the secondary hip flexors, but when I hear hip flexor complaints, the iliopsosas is usually the culprit.

These muscles attach the leg bone to the low spine, but because the area which is generally painful and tight is the iliopsoas tendon (the section that attaches to the bone), you will often hear it referred to as the “hip flexor tendon.” Tendons do not have the same elasticity as muscles, so when stretching, bear in mind you will not get a lot of length out of this area and you will need to hold the poses for a few minutes to relieve tightness.

Some yoga poses which I find helpful for hip flexor tightness include lunges, pigeon, upright frog, bow, and supported bridge. I make no secret of my love for pigeon pose and have covered it fairly extensively in other posts such as The Fast and the Flexible, Part 1. I have also covered lunges in The Fast and the Flexible, Part 3, and would recommend a long lunge set using all three versions with focus on sinking the back leg towards the floor.  Also try giving the following poses a try.

UPRIGHT FROG

Upright Frog, Garland Pose or Squat.
Upright Frog, Garland Pose or Squat.

Stand at the top of your mat with your toes angled out so that the balls of your feet on the floor while your heels remain on the mat. With me so far? Bend your knees slightly and bring the palms of your hands together. Place your elbows on the insides of the knees and flatten out your back. This may be where you stop, but for those ready to venture on, you will start to allow your hips to sink down.

The key here is to keep your heels firmly on the mat, if they start to lift, back out a bit, take a few breaths and test it again. It may take several tries before you obtain the flexibility in your ankles to get all the way down. Under no circumstances should you force your way into this pose, you will hurt yourself and frankly that is simply counter-productive.

And here you are, in the elegant and ever so dignified Upright Frog pose. Try to stay here for 45 -60 seconds, taking deep breaths to ease the discomfort.

BOW POSE

Bow pose is great for opening the entire front side of the body, it works especially well for stretching the front of the hip.  Lie on the floor on your belly, bring you feet towards your backside grasping the outside of the ankles and flexing the feet. As you inhale, gently lift the feet holding on with the hands causing the chest to peel up off the floor.  Take several deep breaths rising slightly on the inhale, sinking on the exhale.  Hold for 30-45 seconds, repeat a second time after a short break.

bow-pose-dhanurasana-picture
Bow Pose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If a full bow pose is a bit daunting right out of the gate, try half bow.  Lie on your belly, place your right arm so your forearm is parallel to the front of the mat.  Reach back with the left hand and grasp the left ankle, flex the foot and start to lift the leg up off the mat.  Press into the front forearm gently lifting the chest from the mat.  Hold for 60 seconds and repeat on the other leg.

Half Bow Pose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPORTED BRIDGE

For as much as my love for pigeon pose knows no bounds, my dislike of bridge is also well known.  Don’t get me wrong, bridge is a useful and beneficial pose, I just don’t happen to like it.  But supported bridge, well that’s another story, this is a pose I can get behind.  What is so great about supported bridge is that it is a passive stretch that requires absolutely no work on your part, sound good? Then lets do it.

You will need a yoga block, if you don’t have one, stack up some books and wrap them with a towel so they stay together. Lie on your back, knees up, feet hip distance apart.  Lift the hips and slide the block under your sacrum (the base of the spine).  You will have to play around with the placement of the block until you find a comfortable spot, then settle in for a few minutes and let the hip flexors passively release.

Supported Bridge
Supported Bridge

A good  sequence of these poses would be lunge series on one side, upright frog in the middle, lunge series on the other side, bow pose two times,  then end with a couple of minutes of supported bridge.

OTHER OPTIONS

I have a couple of other non-yoga suggestions to help release this area.  The first is the dreaded foam roller, yes that little torture device.  Sure they look innocent, little short fat pool noodles in soothing pastel colors but don’t be fooled.  They are ruthless, but very effective.  For hip flexors, lay on your belly and place the roller at the middle of the front thigh.  Slowly roll over the front of  hip and back again several times.  It won’t be pleasant, but it does work.

My second, and far more pleasant option involves you and your couch.  That’s right, the couch.  Lay down on the couch on your back, drop one leg off, bending the knee,  dropping it toward the floor.  Stretch the arms up over head and let the stretch slowly and comfortably develop in the front of the bent leg. Stay here for as long as you like, just be sure to switch sides occasionally.

Tara Kestner is a registered yoga teacher in Sylvania, Ohio and owner of Next Level Yoga, Ltd.  She specializes in designing programs which help athletes improve their performance, prevent injuries, and promote recovery.

 

 

 

 

 

Meditation for Athletes.

Russell Wilson rocks. The Seattle Seahawks use meditation as part of their season long conditioning.
Super Bowl QB Russell Wilson. The Seattle Seahawks use meditation as part of their season long conditioning program. Interesting…

Meditation?  Seriously? I know what you’re thinking, but yes, seriously I am going to talk about meditation for athletes. I consider myself to be a very practical person so my approach to yoga has always been from a real world perspective.  Meditation has always seemed like a bunch of new age hokum.

OK, so I was wrong, it happens. The important thing is I have come around and now understand a regular meditation practice has very tangible physical and mental benefits. Specifically for athletes who are used to being cranked up for competition, it is necessary to stimulate the para-sympathetic nervous system to ground them or eventually they are going to find their tank is empty. Meditation also helps gain control over the breath which can be vitally important when hand-eye control is required like making a free throw, catching a pass or throwing a strike.

Finally, I can’t really explain why, but meditation helps athletes find  and maintain occupancy in “the zone.”  You know “the zone,”  that phenomena when the goal or basket seems to be a mile wide, or your opponents seem to be moving in slow motion.  All athletes seek time in the zone and meditation can help get them there.

At this point,  you are convinced I am right,  and can’t wait to get started.  Right…   I know that look,  I’ve cracked tougher nuts than you.  Just try this short “focus exercise” for five days in a row. If you hate it, give up, go ahead you big quitter. (Dropping some old school coaching on you there).  Really, just try it I sincerely believe you will find it beneficial.

First, sit in a comfortable, semi-quiet place.  A car is a great place to start.  Close your eyes and just settle in. Don’t try to control anything, just sit there letting your thoughts bounce around.  Feel free to think this is stupid if you want, I know I did when I first started.

After about a minute, start to take control of your breath. Inhale, counting 1-2-3  pause, then exhale 1-2-3. Try to visualize the actual numbers 1-2-3 in your mind’s eye as you breath. Do 10 rounds of this 3/3 breath pattern.

After the 3/3  breath pattern you are going to start lengthening you exhales.  Continue counting, this time inhaling 1-2-3-4 pause, then exhale 1-2-3-4-5-6 pause, and repeat this 4/6 pattern for 10 rounds.

After the 4/6 breath, come back to an even 5/5 breath.  Inhale 1-2-3-4-5 pause, exhale 1-2-3-4-5 pause.  Repeat this 5/5 pattern for 10 rounds. Don’t be surprised if you find this a little exhausting, it can be at first.

After you complete the 5/5 breath pattern, just let your breath go back to normal, sit there quietly, eyes closed for about a minute, longer if you want, and then softly open the eyes. See that wasn’t so hard, or weird.

Now, just like one set of sit-ups won’t give you ripped abs, one meditation, sorry focus exercise, won’t bring you enlightenment, but keep it up for 5 days in a row (maybe twice a day if you can hack it) and see what it does for your performance.  I bet you will notice something you can’t quite put you finger on, you’ll feel sharper, clearer, more in control.  In short, better.

Here is a cheat sheet for that focus exercise.

1 minute eyes closed, sitting still.

10 rounds 3/3 breath pattern.

10 rounds 4/6 breath pattern.

10 rounds 5/5 breath pattern.

1 minute eyes closed, sitting still.

 

The Fast & the Flexible: Yoga for Runners. Part 3- Hips, Glutes and Low Back.

In this last installment of The Fast & the Flexible series, we have reached the part of the body that brings the majority of people to yoga class, the hips and low back. We will address the glutes as well, but I rarely get a new client who openly complains that their butt hurts, at least not right away.

Low back pain,three words everyone can appreciate.  It is the common thread which binds all people from world-class athletes to 70-year-old grandmas, we can all relate.  This pain can have a variety of causes, sitting too long, picking up stuff, wearing high heels, and commonly, the repetitive pounding of running.

Depending on the actual problem causing the pain, medical intervention may be necessary and if you suffer unrelenting back pain, seek medical advice.  But, as with the hamstring, low back issues are easier to prevent than they are to heal so read on.

Much low back pain can be avoided or alleviated by keeping the hips loose.  The hip joint is the most stable in the body because it is surrounded by muscles on all sides, if any of them tighten up it can affect the function of the joint.  The joint itself is a deep-set ball and socket, and may take a little more work to open than a shallow joint like the shoulder.

If I could only use one yoga pose it would be Pigeon.  This pose is like medicine for all issues related to the low back and hip area.  I use it in every class, for every athlete regardless of their sport, it is truly the universal solvent. The following poses are all great for establishing and maintaining flexibility in the low back, glutes and hips.

FIRST POSE- Pigeon three ways.

Pigeon, prone version.
Pigeon, prone version.

The prone version of pigeon is the most effective, but I find a lot of athletes think it is an enhanced interrogation technique, therefore, I am going to offer three versions, choose the one that suits you.

For prone pigeon, start in downward facing dog, extend and lift your left leg behind you to level out the hips.  From this cleverly named, “three-legged dog” position, bend the knee towards the chest and place it down behind your left wrist.  Reach back with the right foot and drop the right knee cap onto the ground.  Untuck the right foot and press the top of the foot into the ground.

The closer your front knee is to a right angle, the more intense this will be, so bring the foot more under you the first time.  Lift onto your fingertips and look at the ceiling, envision a long, straight spine.  If you are tipped to either side, correct this before you proceed.  Lower down onto your forearms,  and maybe stack your fists or forearms and lower your forehead down so you can rest. You are going to be here a while so get comfortable (comfort being a relative term, of course).

Hold this pose for 1-5 minutes, then repeat on the other side.  Yes you read that right, 5 minutes.  Close the eyes, focus on your exhales and allow your self to sink in, it will get easier after about 30-45 seconds, so stay with it.  I cannot overstate the value of this pose for any athlete.  If this version seems impossible because your hips are welded shut, then try the reclined version of this pose.

Reclined Pigeon pose.
Reclined Pigeon pose.

Lie on your back with bent knees, feet on the ground.  Place one ankle on the top of the other knee, similar to how you sit in a chair with loosely crossed legs. Raise the foot on the floor, maintaining a right angle in the leg. Reach through the triangle that is created by the legs and grasp the back of the thigh and draw the leg towards the chest.  Hold this pose for 1 to 5 minutes on each side.

pigeon wall
Reclined Pigeon using a wall.

Another nice option is to plant the bottom foot on a wall as shown above.  Reclined pigeon fantastic pose to gently release the low back, hip, glutes and, to a lesser degree, the hip flexors and hamstrings.

SECOND POSE- Dead Bug.

Bug, Dead Bug.
Bug, Dead Bug.

Ahh Dead Bug, how I love you, your weird name is a guaranteed laugh every time. It is great pose to release the low back and stretch the hips.    Lie on your back and draw your knees toward the chest.  Reach the hands inside the knees and either grab the outside edge of the foot or the big toe with your peace fingers. Draw the knees down as you aim the soles of your feet at the sky.

To get maximum benefits from this pose remember to keep your low back firmly pressed on the ground. You can rock gently from side to side if that feels good.  Hold for 1 to 2 minutes.

If you are stiff and sore and only have 10 minutes to stretch, please do these poses, they will give you the most bang for your buck.  I know as a teacher you are not supposed to have favorites, but let’s just say I am very fond of these poses and leave it at that.  I hope you have found this series helpful, if you would like more information about how to use yoga to take your running to the next level please contact me at kestnert@bex.net.

Tara Kestner is a registered yoga teacher in Sylvania, Ohio and owner of Next Level Yoga, Ltd.  She specializes in designing programs which help athlete’s improve their performance, prevent injuries, and promote recovery.